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  HOME | Uruguay

Uruguay to Increase Work Opportunities for Inmates to Combat Lack of Security

MONTEVIDEO – Uruguay’s Interior Ministry and the Montevideo city administration on Monday signed an agreement that will seek to increase work opportunities for people deprived of their freedom, thus contributing to fighting the lack of safety in the South American country.

“This is one of the basic steps in the fight for citizen safety, it’s one of the tasks in which we’re all involved,” said capital administrator Daniel Martinez at the signing ceremony.

He said that his institution is making “a type of review of places” where inmates may be incorporated into the working world, along with people accused of crimes, to contribute to the process of rehabilitation.

Specifically, Martinez said that the National Rehabilitation Institute and the Interior Ministry will be the agencies tasked with defining the guidelines and making the evaluations so that such people may be hired and receive remuneration for their work, since the idea is to comply with all prevailing laws.

Meanwhile, Interior Minister Eduardo Bonomi said that the document his office signed includes allowing “people deprived of freedom, released (prisoners) and those who have been accused under the law of infractions to do tasks to support the public.”

He said that when he assumed his post in 2010, under the government of former President Jose Mujica, “there were 80 people working” but “now there are more than 3,000 ... and others who are studying,” although he added that that figure is “not enough.”

“The only way to rehabilitate those who have lost their freedom due to the way of life they adopted is work and study,” the minister said.

Martinez, meanwhile, said that the aim is “to create activities that provide opportunities to citizens so that they have the quickest and best process of reinsertion into society.”

“We’re making great efforts to contribute to this rehabilitation process, which is basic because if we don’t lower the indices of recidivism in the prisons we’re going to have more and more people inside them and more and more problems,” he said.

The agreement signed on Monday comes in addition to other pacts inked by the Interior Ministry to contribute to the rehabilitation via study and work of people whose freedom was removed after they were found guilty of criminal acts.

 

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