|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Uruguay

Uruguay Inaugurates First Cannabis Museum in South America

MONTEVIDEO – Uruguay inaugurated on Thursday the first cannabis museum in South America, seeking to show visitors the history of cannabis and educate them about the “enormous variety of uses” the plant has, according to its director, Eduardo Blasina.

The Cannabis Museum of Montevideo (MCM) is located in the heart of the Uruguayan capital, in the Palermo district, and will put the country on a “global map that also includes Amsterdam, Barcelona, Spain, and California,” according to a statement released by the museum.

The idea, according to Blasina, came from the legalization of the sale and production of marijuana in Uruguay in December 2013, during President Jose Mujica’s administration (2010-2015).

The director of the museum, who is also a partner in one of the companies that was granted rights for the production of marijuana in Uruguay, claimed that cannabis “is a plant that offers multiple benefits,” but he said that “the discourse focuses only on one of its features.”

For this reason, he pointed that it is good for the visitor to “know that cannabis has been cultivated for thousands of years” and that “it has an enormous variety of uses.”

Blasina also referred to the possibility that the museum could serve to promote tourism related to cannabis and thus arrival of foreign visitors.

The head of the museum also mentioned the difficulties of marijuana regulation in Uruguay, saying that although the government had legalized the sale and production three years ago, the permission to buy marijuana legally is still on hold.

Although the legislation provides that officially registered users can buy 10 grams of cannabis a week, but no more than 40 grams per month, the Uruguayan authorities have not yet been able to implement this aspect of the law.

In addition, Uruguayan President Tabare Vazquez has recently announced that marijuana will not be sold publicly before the end of this year.

Blasina explained that the other two parts of the law – which provide for self-cultivation and the creation of cannabis clubs – “are working very well.”

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2015 © All rights reserved