|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Uruguay

Uruguayans March to Demand Higher Salaries, More Education Spending

MONTEVIDEO – An estimated 30,000 workers from different sectors rallied Thursday in the Uruguayan capital to press their demands for higher salaries and more education spending.

The march, which began at the main campus of the University of the Republic and ended near the Legislative Palace, was organized by Uruguay’s main labor federation, the PIT-CNT, as part of a four-hour partial strike.

PIT-CNT President Fernando Pereira stressed the importance of the job action, telling reporters that workers were calling on the Uruguayan government to make further investments in the education sector.

“Real salaries in the education sector have climbed 70 percent over the past 10 years, and even so teacher salaries are less than $800 a month,” the labor leader said.

“What are we saying? That even with all these changes, more growth is needed in the education sector,” he added.

He said the PIT-CNT was calling for more money for education to ensure the benefits reach all sectors of society.

Pereira, however, stressed that workers were not calling for a return to the “neo-liberal model (in place under conservative governments) between 1990 and 2005,” when he said the lack of three-pronged negotiations among the government, employers and unions was detrimental to workers.

“Neo-liberal” is in Latin America a term used as a slur by leftists to describe advocates of free-market, laissez-faire economic policies.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2015 © All rights reserved