|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Uruguay

New Stamp Honors Uruguayan Mathematician Jose Luis Massera

MONTEVIDEO – Uruguayan mathematician Jose Luis Massera, who solved the problem of equilibrium stability in non-linear differential equations, has been honored in Montevideo with a stamp bearing his image to mark the centennial of his birth.

“There is a saying that we Uruguayan mathematicians owe Massera the theorem of existence,” said Roberto Markarian, president of the University of the Republic and author of a Massera biography.

“It is true that Uruguay’s mathematics school is Massera’s daughter,” he said.

Massera, an engineer by training, has won worldwide recognition among mathematicians for his pioneering work on the converse to Lyapunov’s criterion through the well-known Massera’s lemma.

Massera was the first to produce a resolution to a theorem that had been researched for many years, especially by Soviet mathematicians of worldwide reputation in the 1940s and 1950s.

“Massera’s theorem and his efforts, along with (Rafael) Laguardia, to strengthen a specific branch of basic sciences in our country cannot be forgotten,” Markarian said.

Born in Genoa, Italy, in 1915 to Uruguayan parents, Massera died in Montevideo in 2002 after a career that earned him nine honorary doctorates from universities around the world.

Massera, a leader of the Uruguayan Communist Party, was detained in 1975 by the 1973-1985 military regime and tortured during his eight years in prison.

Scientists from around the world created a Paris-based international committee to win his freedom and the military regime released him in 1984.

Massera’s wife, Martha Valentini, and their daughter, Ema Massera, were invited to join Postal Service director Solange Moreira to cancel the stamp issued in the mathematician’s honor.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2015 © All rights reserved