|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Uruguay

Social Networks Promote Mass Farewell for Uruguay’s Mujica

MONTEVIDEO – Self-proclaimed “ordinary” Uruguayans are using social networks to organize a mass farewell to President Jose “Pepe” Mujica on the eve of the March 1 inauguration of his successor, former head of state Tabare Vazquez.

So far, roughly 5,000 people have signed up on Facebook to gather in Montevideo’s Independence Square at sundown on Feb. 28 for a flag-lowering ceremony.

“Let us accompany the president at the moment of the flag-lowering at the National Pavilion,” reads the original message on Facebook. “Let us go to the square carrying Uruguayan flags.”

The ceremony, traditionally attended by throngs of officials and diplomats, entails the lowering of the flag that has flown over the presidential palace and its presentation to the outgoing head of state by members of the Presidential Guard.

Haydee Garcia, one of the organizers of the sendoff for Mujica, said the intention is “to reward, thank and recognize a man who has been so close to the people.”

Mujica, 79, is a former Tupamaro guerrilla who spent more than a decade in prison under the 1973-1985 military regime. As president, he has won international admiration for his modest lifestyle and forthrightness, and for promoting measures such as the legalization of marijuana.

“We are ordinary citizens, we don’t hold government or political posts,” Garcia said. “We are workers, common people, with a low profile, and we want to keep it that way.”

Hundreds of thousands of Uruguayans lined the streets of Montevideo for Mujica’s March 1, 2010, inauguration, cheering as the “Pepemobile” carried him from Congress to Independence Square to receive the presidential sash.

On the previous day, then-outgoing chief executive Tabare Vazquez was cheered by some 5,000 people who turned the flag-lowering ceremony into an homage to the first leftist president in the country’s history.

“In 2010,” Garcia recalled, “the media announced the (flag) event and many of us spontaneously decided to attend.”

The Facebook campaign also invites Uruguayans to support the All Together Plan, a Mujica initiative to help low-income families to build homes, and to which the president has donated most of his salary.

Mujica, who remains extremely popular, could not seek re-election because Uruguay’s constitution bans a president from serving consecutive terms.

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:



 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2015 © All rights reserved