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  HOME | Uruguay

Marijuana Handbook Debuts in Uruguay

MONTEVIDEO – Almost a year after Uruguay legalized the production and sale of marijuana, a group that campaigned for the legislation is publishing a handbook with instructions for the growing and consumption of cannabis.

Titled “Uruguay se planta,” – a play on words that can be read both as Uruguay plants and Uruguay stands up – the volume from the Proderechos group describes in detail how to cultivate the plant and the different ways to consume it, co-author Camilo Collazo told Efe.

Last December, Uruguay became the first country in the Americas to legalize the production, sale and consumption of marijuana.

Since Aug. 1, Uruguayan citizens and legal permanent residents can apply at their local post office for a license to grow marijuana plants at home.

The license allows the cultivation of up to six plants, yielding up to 480 grams (17 ounces) per year for personal consumption. Under the law, weed users may form clubs with up to 45 members cultivating as many as 99 marijuana plants, the handbook explains.

The Uruguayan government last month solicited bids from firms interested in growing pot for sale at pharmacies, both for medical and recreational purposes.

People who don’t grow their own pot can purchase up to 40 grams a month at pharmacies for less than $1.

Besides a detailed description of the law and regulations, the handbook has a whole section devoted to advice about cultivation of marijuana at home, Collazo said.

There is also a history of cannabis, a description of how the psychoactive substances in marijuana affect the user and recipes including marijuana as an ingredient.

Proderechos is satisfied with marijuana legalization in Uruguay, Collazo said, but efforts must be made to educate society to understand that the group’s goal is not to promote pot consumption, but rather to reduce it and to weaken the drug trafficking organizations.

“What this law is missing is a good outreach tool,” he said.

 

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