|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Central America

Interfaith Collaboration Flourishes in Panama Ahead of Papal Visit

PANAMA CITY – Aided by several students from the Islamic school, the imam of Panama City’s Jummah Masjid mosque stacks cases of bottled water that his congregation will distribute among the pilgrims who gather next week when Pope Francis comes to Panama for World Youth Day (WYD).

“We are going to distribute 15,000 bottles of cold water. As hot as the weather is right now, cold water is going to be a treasure,” Ismael Mankda says.

Jummah Masjid, an imposing whitewashed building with a green dome, is located just feet away from Panama City’s seaside boulevard, where some of the largest events of the Jan. 22-27 WYD will take place.

A score of Muslim volunteers will be stationed on the side of the mosque with coolers full of water bottles to help the thousands of visiting Catholic pilgrims cope with the stifling heat and intense sun.

This will be the first time the WYD is held in a Central American country.

Mankda, the descendant of Indian immigrants, said that the Islamic community decided to participate in the WYD because “it is not just a Catholic event, but an event for the country and the region.”

“Here we have very good communication among all the religions. The churches even bring tourists to us to learn about the mosque because it was the first one built in Central America,” he told EFE.

In Panama, interfaith collaboration is not just for special occasions, Mankda says.

Diversity is part of the identity of this young country of 4 million inhabitants, which – because of its geographical position and its role in maritime trade – is a melting pot of races, cultures, ethnicities and religions.

While 80 percent of Panamanians are Catholics, the country is also home to more than 7,000 Muslims and to the largest Jewish community in Central America, numbering 15,000.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2020 © All rights reserved