|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Central America

Hondurans Keep Leaving Homeland a Week after Migrant Caravan Set Out

AGUA CALIENTE, Honduras – Warnings from the US, Mexico and Guatemala have not stopped the migration of thousands of Hondurans, who now number some 3,000 according to the United Nations, and who set out a week ago in a caravan to the United States.

The first group of migrants left Honduras last Oct. 13 from San Pedro Sula and proceeded to the customs station at Agua Caliente on the border with Guatemala, through which men, women and children have continued to pour all week, under strict control, in a drama that has increased the breakup of Honduran families.

An advance party of the caravan reached Mexico on Thursday, where the government reported it was already receiving asylum applications.

On Wednesday, hundreds of migrants left their country by another route, through El Amatillo on the El Salvador border, where authorities registered 1,235 Hondurans up to Thursday, though with no certainty that all of them intended to catch up with the caravan that set out last Saturday.

The massive migration got a political slant when Tegucigalpa and Washington accused opposition political parties of causing it, though migrants in Agua Caliente told EFE they were leaving their homeland of their own accord.

The US has threatened to block any further aid to Honduras if doesn’t stop the caravan.

Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernandez, meanwhile, has said that “this irregular mobilization was organized for political purposes.”

The opposition’s intention is to “erode the governability, the image and good name, the stability and peace of Honduras and other countries on the route to the United States,” he said.

Former Honduran President Manuel Zelaya has said that the US is “legally and morally obliged to provide asylum” for the migrants “because of the state of terror and death brought on by the military violence, fraud, privatizations and organized crime of the JOH (Juan Orlando Hernandez) dictatorship that it maintains and supports.”

More than 1 million Hondurans living in the United States, either legal residents or undocumented migrants, represent an important contribution to their homeland through the family remittances they send home, which in 2017 amounted to some $4 billion.

Honduras has a population of some 9 million, of whom more than 60% live in poverty and over 2 million are either unemployed or underemployed, according to various sources.

Many employees are paid extremely low wages, a contrast with the high cost of food, medicines, education, public services – generally inadequate – and fuel, among other products and services.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2020 © All rights reserved