|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Central America

Panama Ready to Welcome Birdwatchers for Fall Migration

PANAMA CITY – With their binoculars, cameras and other optical aids, birdwatchers are almost always ready to venture off to watch the Panamanian skies, where millions of birds migrate south each autumn from North America.

The birds will begin heading south into Mexico, Central and South America once the weather starts getting colder in more northern climes, seeking more moderate weather to rest, fatten themselves up and reproduce.

The October-November period is the prime time for observing migrating birds in Panama, which has a history of the activity dating back more than 120 years, with the country nowadays constituting a key destination for so-called “green tourism,” which has grown markedly in recent years.

There are three basic migrations – birds of prey, shorebirds and songbirds – and millions of each kind travel to areas near the Panamanian capital, Venicio Wilson, a member of the Audubon Society of Panama, told EFE.

“In the sport of birdwatching, people come as collectors, and in that search for (observing) new species, Panama is a (key) destination,” he said.

“It’s not for nothing that ... the main (birding) country of Central America with 1,010 species of all sorts of birds, wants to attract more and more visitors from North America, Europe and Asia,” he said.

In the international birdwatching competition known as the Global Big Day in May, the isthmus was No. 1 in Central America and sixth worldwide, with about 750 species of birds seen in a single day, exceeding Costa Rica’s 685.

The head of the department of International Communications for the Panama Tourism Authority, Gilberto Alemancia, told EFE that the sector attracts mainly affluent visitors coming from the US, Canada, the UK, France and Germany.

“Many (people) wanting to document exotic species are ready to travel to distant locations, without regard for the cost, given that the majority are also experts and researchers,” Alemancia said.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2019 © All rights reserved