|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Central America

Honor and Tradition, Prizes at Ancestral Games of Panama’s Embera Tribe

IPETI, Panama – Amid a dense jungle bathed by the tranquil waters of the Ipeti River, spears, bows and arrows become emblems of Panama’s indigenous Embera people in the regular games held to celebrate the tribe’s ancestral skills and raise the value of their cultural traditions in an environment ever more influenced by the modern world.

The mountains, sacred witnesses for the indigenous people who inhabit enclaves in the eastern jungle province of Darien, are also the proving ground where the Embera learn skills that many use in their daily lives, and for the athletes among the tribesmen and -women these skills can be the key to sports glory.

Both men and women line up in the blazing sun to participate in each of the 12 contests of the 2nd Ancestral Games of the Embera, which place a value on stamina, courage and honor among the youngest members of the community.

Wearing a skirt of bright cloth and a shirt to protect her body, 21-year-old Elizabeth Dequia, tired from her competition, tells EFE about her participation in the “trunk race,” during which she carried a piece of teak wood weighing more than 18 kilograms (about 40 pounds) up and down slopes.

“I’m a competitor. Besides carrying the trunk, I was also in the 10-kilometer (22-mile) race, but always ... for the love I have for the culture and for my family who supports me,” she told EFE.

Another athlete who stood out by winning the 100-meter race was Yamilca Flaco, whose body is decorated with tattoos made with ink from the berry of the tropical Genipa americana tree. She told EFE that her motivation to compete comes from her desire to show everyone what indigenous women can do.

“I entered the Ancestral Games, above all for my father, who told me to be in this contest, and I also felt that my people supported me, although it’s not a regular sports event,” the 19-year-old Flaco said.

In the international competition in Canada in 2017, the Panamanian athletic delegation won 17 medals, nine of them gold in the areas of spearthrowing, swimming and the 100-meter race.

The president and organizer of the sports activity, Elvis Flaco, told EFE that the Ancestral Games include bow and arrow use, strength tests, swimming, spearthrowing, canoeing, racing with treetrunks, woodsplitting, blowpipe use and assorted other daily activities.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2019 © All rights reserved