|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Central America

Panama Canal Marks Transit of 3,000 Neo-Panamax Ships since Expansion

PANAMA CITY – A container ship became the 3,000th neo-Panamax vessel to cross the Panama Canal since the waterway’s expansion 20 months ago, the Panama Canal Authority (ACP) said Friday.

At around 7 am, the Panamanian-flagged MSC Caterina, pulled by two tugboats, passed through the Cocoli lock in the Pacific sector, on its way to the Atlantic, the ACP said.

“Today, with the MSC Caterina, we have achieved the challenge of having 3,000 neo-Panamax crossings in the expanded canal,” chief administrator Jorge Luis Quijano said on Twitter.

The Caterina, measuring 300 m (984.3 ft) from bow to stern and 48 m (157.5 ft) from port to starboard, can carry 9,000 containers.

The ACP said that nearly 53 percent of the neo-Panamax vessels travelling through the expanded canal have been cargo ships.

Another 38 percent have been tankers carrying liquefied petroleum gas and liquefied natural gas.

The canal was constructed by the United States at the beginning of the 20th century and was handed over to Panama on Dec. 31, 1999.

Nearly 6 percent of world trade crosses through the canal via more than 140 sea routes linking 1,700 ports in 160 different countries.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2018 © All rights reserved