|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Central America

Honduran Woman with Rare Blood Disease Threatened with Deportation from US

MIAMI – Activists and domestic workers gathered on Monday in front of the immigration headquarters in South Florida to support undocumented Honduran Reyna Gomez, who is facing deportation.

Gomez, a domestic worker, attended her regular monthly interview with authorities at the Immigration and Customs Enforcement building in Miramar, in Broward County, north of Miami.

After appearing with her attorney before a judge, Gomez – who suffers from a rare blood disorder, a form of leukemia – left the federal offices and told reporters that she had been treated well by the officials and asked to return in two weeks to give authorities time to continue considering her asylum request.

Activists and community associations have warned about the increase in the number of migrants in irregular circumstances who are being detained when they come to their regular court hearings, a tactic they are referring to as “silent raids.”

“They’re making fun of us. The immigrants come to their hearings following the law and many are ending up detained,” Maria Bilbao, an activist with the United We Dream group, who came to Miramar on Monday to support Gomez, told EFE.

Bilbao recommended that all undocumented migrants or immigrants who are in the process of regularizing their status consult with a lawyer before showing up in court at the ICE facilities.

Gomez, Bilbao said, continually has her status monitored by authorities at the different hearings she attends, but “now they’ve asked her for more proof” of her medical condition to support her request to remain in the US.

Authorities have given her 30 days to produce such documentation, but she is worried that it might not be enough time for her to receive the required government documents from Honduras.

Gomez, 49, came to the US 15 years ago illegally, but now her doctor tells her that if she were deported back to Honduras it would be a death sentence because there is no treatment for her blood condition – known as thrombocythemia – there.

That is why she came to her interview on Monday with a lawyer, for the first time ever.

Under President Donald Trump’s administration, “we’re all a priority and they arrest you simply because you don’t have a driver’s license,” said Bilbao, who emphasized that Gomez had been contributing to the country’s economy by working here.

Gomez, who fled her homeland to escape domestic violence, said she had never committed a crime in the US, except to come here without documents.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2015 © All rights reserved