|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Bolivia

Bolivian Leader: Drug War a Pretext for U.S. Intervention

UNITED NATIONS – The U.S. uses the war on drugs as an excuse to intervene in the affairs of other countries, Bolivian President Evo Morales said on Thursday.

The militarized, prohibitionist approach to the problem has been a failure, he said during a drug-policy summit in the UN General Assembly.

“From the decade of the (19)80s the misnamed war on drugs has brought us to a scenario that systematically violated countries’ sovereignty and worsened public health conditions and internal security,” the Bolivian said.

Following the end the Cold War, Washington seized on the illegal drug trade as an “excuse to apply an imperialist logic” in resource-rich regions such as Latin America, Morales said.

He called on the General Assembly to implement “concrete actions” to end the use of the drug problem “as a pretext for domination.”

Bolivia’s first indigenous president has fought for years to get the United Nations to remove coca leaf from the list of narcotics.

In its unadulterated form, coca is a mild stimulant that indigenous Andean people have used for millennia to counteract altitude sickness and Bolivia, like neighboring Peru, permits the cultivation of the leaf in limited amounts for use in teas, folk remedies and Andean religious rites.

Morales, who remains the leader of the Bolivian coca growers union, pointed out Thursday that his government’s policies have reduced coca cultivation to its lowest level in a decade.

Holding up a coca leaf, he said the plant “has been a victim of the interests of drug trafficking and capitalism.”

Since 2008, when Morales expelled the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, Bolivia has come in for criticism in Washington’s annual reports on countries’ performance in the war on drugs, even though the current government in La Paz has seized far more than cocaine than any of its predecessors.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2018 © All rights reserved