|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Bolivia

Bolivian Quinoa Industry Seeks Technological Boost

LA PAZ – The quinoa industry in Bolivia requires technological advances to reverse a reduction in both output and exports, growers and experts say.

In 2015, Bolivia yielded to Peru the spot of top exporter of quinoa to the United States, while groups representing growers estimate that Bolivian production of the grain could fall from 90,000 tons last year to 40,000 tons in 2016.

“Those figures are still preliminary,” Paula Mejia, general manager of the Bolivian Chamber of Quinoa and Organic Products Exporters, told EFE, adding that even if the forecast proves correct, output would still be sufficient to meet demand for quinoa exports.

Bolivia exported 23,000 tons of quinoa in the first 11 months of last year, down 44 percent by value and 14 percent by volume compared with the same period in 2014.

“The fall in prices reflects a larger supply in global markets, and the drop in volume, that – as has been known – some quinoa producers chose to hold back inventory, awaiting better prices in the future,” government statistics chief Gary Rodriguez told EFE.

Benjamin Martinez, president of the National Quinoa Producers Association, highlighted the industry’s concerns.

“We will need to go to the government” in pursuit of “financing for irrigation,” he told EFE.

Quinoa production, according to Paula Mejia, requires “a technological leap to mechanize sowing, harvesting, everything to do with the irrigation and the drying of the grain.”

Rodriguez advocates “providing growers with training and technology to improve their productivity,” as well as funding for research into “how to shorten the production cycle to make the crop sustainable.”

Quinoa, a grain domesticated in the Andes some 7,000 years ago, is considered sacred by the indigenous people of the Bolivian highlands.

The grain has high nutritional value as a result of the concentration of proteins and hydrates. Quinoa can also grow in dry conditions and at altitudes of up to 4,000 meters (13,115 feet).

Growing awareness of quinoa’s virtues has resulted in a global boom in the grain in recent years.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2015 © All rights reserved