|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Bolivia

Bakers Stop Baking Traditional Bolivian Bread in La Paz

LA PAZ – The bakers of La Paz will not bake ‘marraqueta’, a traditional Bolivian bread symbolic of the city, as a part of a strike in opposition to the Bolivian government’s removal of a flour subsidy, a trade-union source told Efe.

“Marraqueta will be missing from the market until they give us the actual price,” said Felix Quenta, president of La Paz’s Bakers Association, on Wednesday.

The leaders of the strike waited, without joy, for dialogue with the government to discuss their petition.

The protest, led by unions in La Paz and the neighboring city of Alto, follows the government’s decision to withdraw a flour subsidy begun in 2011, which has affected their income.

Quenta said that the strike will continue until Thursday, and from Friday they will only sell an alternative to marraqueta called ‘war’ bread, a round piece of plain bread, crumbly and crunchy and at only 2.1 Oz, much lighter than marraqueta.

In 2006, marraqueta was declared part of the cultural and historical heritage of La Paz.

The bakers said that the plain bread will cost $0.07, while the government insists that, like the marraqueta, it should sell for $0.05.
In response to the bread shortage, the Bolivian government has tasked the army with making bread.

Soldiers have baked as much as 210,000 units of bread each day of the strike, insufficient to meet the demands of La Paz and Alto’s two million residents.

The Bolivian government said the price of un-subsidized flour is similar to prices ten years ago, and that bread production is still profitable without the subsidy.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2015 © All rights reserved