|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Bolivia

Bolivia Works to Fill Mountain Mined for Over 5 Centuries

LA PAZ – Bolivian officials have dumped roughly 30,000 tons of dirt on Cerro Rico to keep the shape of the Potosi mountain, which is sinking after more than five centuries of mining for silver and other minerals.

The Cooperative Mining Services firm started the fill operation on March 23 and still has to move some 20,000 tons of dirt and rocks onto Cerro Rico, the Mining Ministry said in a statement.

The government wants to preserve the conical shape of Cerro Rico, designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1986.

The top of the mountain, which is 4,702 meters (15,426 feet) above sea level, has been dented by a 35-meter (115-foot) wide and 40-meter (130-foot) deep sinkhole.

Cerro Rico’s silver and other mineral deposits have been exploited continually since 1545 and were the main source of wealth for Spain in colonial times.

At the current pace, the fill work should be completed by April 12, the ministry said.

The dirt being used for fill is from Pailaviri, located some nine kilometers (5.6 miles) away, where roughly 3 million tons of the mountain’s dirt have been dumped since 1952.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2015 © All rights reserved