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  HOME | Bolivia

Bolivia Plans to Create “Sovereign Cloud” to Improve Computer Security

LA PAZ – Bolivian lawmakers are drafting a bill to develop a “sovereign cloud,” or technology platform, that will store government information with the goal of “strengthening Bolivia’s sovereignty and computer security,” the Senate said.

The cloud computing system will be located in Sucre, a city in southern Bolivia and the constitutional capital of the country.

The system will provide “information, computing, communications, storage and national Web services infrastructure,” the Senate said in a statement.

The Web sites of several government departments, including the Communications Ministry, the National Police and the navy, have been attacked by Chilean hackers in recent months.

The hackers posted messages on the official Web sites about the maritime dispute between Bolivia and Chile.

The government said earlier this month that the attacks did not threaten national security or classified information, but officials recommended taking action to improve computer security.

The plan to create a cloud computing system for data storage, to be called Sumaj Wakaycha, was presented by ruling party Sen. Nelida Sifuentes, who serves as first vice president of the Senate.

Other countries already have virtual technology platforms of this type, Sifuentes said.

The goal is to “improve virtual public services, strengthening Bolivia’s sovereignty and computer security in the management of the digital information of state institutions and privacy of users’ data,” the senator said.

The Public Works Ministry would be responsible for creating the cloud computing system within two years of the legislation being signed into law.


 

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