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  HOME | Bolivia

Chilean Hackers Attack Bolivian Ministry Web Site

LA PAZ – Chilean hackers attacked the Web site of the Bolivian Communications Ministry with messages against La Paz’s demand that Chile reestablish its sovereign corridor to the sea lost in a 19th century war.

The Chilean Hackers group, who took responsibility for the attack, posted on its Twitter account a screen capture of the ministry’s Web page, which is now temporarily incapacitated.

In the image can be seen a Chilean flag with the message “Viva Chile ... We inform you that: You will never have the sea!”

The same group took responsibility last week for a similar hack-attack against the Web sites of the Bolivian navy and police.

Bolivian Vice President Alvaro Garcia Linera said he regretted the incident and recommended that the country’s computer security be enhanced, adding – however – that these type of acts do not threaten the country’s security or its classified information.

Bolivia lost 400 kilometers (about 250 miles) of coastline and 120,000 square kilometers (46,130 square miles) of territory to Chile in the War of the Pacific (1879-1883).

The Bolivian government, however, has claimed that it was the victim of a Chilean invasion without a prior declaration of war.

In 2013, now-landlocked Bolivia presented a claim before the International Court of Justice at The Hague seeking a ruling that would force Chile to negotiate restoring its Pacific Ocean access.

Chile, on the other hand, argues that its border disputes with Bolivia were resolved in a pact signed in 1904 and the government of President Michelle Bachelet has said that the ICJ has jurisdiction only in matters arising after it was founded in 1948.


 

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