|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Bolivia

Bolivia to Fight Crime with 1,500 Security Cameras

LA PAZ – Bolivia will purchase 1,500 security cameras for public safety purposes using a Chinese $35 million loan, Vice President Alvaro Garcia Linera announced Monday.

“Throughout Bolivia, we have about 700 cameras working in important (locations). We’re buying another 1,500 cameras, it’s a Chinese loan, we’re going to establish some special monitoring centers ... that are going to observe all the important streets and commercial centers.”

Garcia Linera will once again be President Evo Morales’ running mate in the Oct. 12 elections, where both are seeking reelection for a third mandate to run until 2020.

The administration is intending to implement elsewhere in the nation the security plan undertaken in June in the eastern city of Santa Cruz during the summit of the Group of 77 developing nations plus China.

At that event, the vice president said, Bolivia undertook an “excellent security deployment,” which managed to reduce crime in Santa Cruz by 20 percent.

For the G77 Summit, the Bolivian government strengthened security in Santa Cruz with 500 police officers, while the provincial and municipal administrations contributed more than 150 patrol vehicles to the security forces and financed the installation of 266 cameras to monitor the streets.

Garcia Linera said that the municipalities are obligated by law to allocate to public safety 10 percent of the resources they receive from a tax paid by the oil companies on production of natural gas for export, but some city administrations are not complying with this requirement.

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:



 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2015 © All rights reserved