|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Bolivia

Bolivia Powers Up First Solar Energy Plant

LA PAZ Bolivia has inaugurated its first solar energy plant, built by Spanish company Isotron and partly financed with a grant from Denmark.

President Evo Morales, who attended the inauguration in Cobija, 700 kilometers (435 miles) north of La Paz, said the plant will initially generate 1.7 MW before reaching its maximum output of 5 MW in November.

Built on 11 hectares (27 acres) of land near the border with Brazil, the facility has 17,334 solar panels. Denmark paid 60 percent of the cost of the $11.8 million project, while the Bolivian government covered the rest.

State-owned utility ENE said the Cobija solar energy plant is unique in the world, as it generates power from both photovoltaic panels and diesel fuel.

The city of Cobija is not connected to the Bolivian national electric grid and obtains most of its power from diesel-fueled plants.

Cobija and the nearby towns of Puerto Rico and Porvenir have a combined demand of 9 MW and the new plant will supply move than 50 percent of that, allowing a reduction in diesel imports that will save the government about $3 million a year.

This was the first work in Bolivia by Isastur subsidiary Isotron. Other Spanish engineering companies are at work building facilities for the Bolivian oil and gas industry.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2015 © All rights reserved