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  HOME | Cuba

Mexico Believes Cuba’s Tenacity Will Protect It from Trump

CANCUN, Mexico – Mexican Foreign Secretary Luis Videgaray said on Monday that Cuba’s enormous tenacity will protect it against the decision taken by US President Donald Trump to toughen his country’s policies toward the island.

The Republican’s actions are added to “things that have been done over the decades, and if the Cuban people have shown anything, it is their enormous tenacity,” Videgaray told EFE in an interview.

As the Mexican Foreign Relations Secretariat (SRE) did last Friday, minutes after the US freezing of its normalization of relations with Cuba, the foreign secretary called for “dialogue, negotiation and agreement” between the two countries.

“We have an important working relationship of many dimensions with the United States government, but that doesn’t mean we have to change our close, friendly relationship and solidarity with the Cuban people,” he said.

Asked if the latest actions by Trump will affect the island’s economy, Videgaray said simply that the matter would have to be “analyzed.”

Between June 19-21, Mexico will host the General Assembly of the Organization of American States (OAS) at the Mexican resort of Cancun, an annual meeting that this year will concentrate on the Venezuelan crisis, since a number of countries are seeking to pass a joint statement on the situation in the Caribbean nation.

In that context, Videgaray considered that the last-minute decision by US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson not to attend the OAS General Assembly, in order to deal with the diplomatic crisis in the Persian Gulf, does not signify a snub by the White House to the hemispheric organization.

“I perceive a United States government that works very closely with the others, and with a lot of spirit, as it has in this group of 14 countries where we have come up with different proposals for diplomacy with Venezuela,” he said.

Before the official inauguration this Monday, a foreign ministers’ meeting will be held on the Venezuelan crisis to resume the talks suspended last May 31 for lack of agreement among the participating countries on a joint proposal.

Reaching a consensus will not be easy, because a foreign ministers’ meeting requires 23 votes to approve any measure, or two-thirds of the countries represented.

It will therefore be necessary that nine nations join the group of 14 countries in favor of OAS mediation in the Venezuelan crisis: Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, United States, Honduras, Guatemala, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Peru and Uruguay.

 

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