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  HOME | Cuba

Hard for Castro Regime to Survive Fidel’s Death, Vargas Llosa Says

GUADALAJARA, Mexico – Peruvian writer Mario Vargas Llosa said at Mexico’s Guadalajara International Book Fair Sunday that it would be “very difficult” for the regime in Cuba to survive the death of revolutionary leader Fidel Castro.

“As with the death of (Soviet leader Josef) Stalin, as with all the great dictators. It’s very difficult for the regime to survive the dictator’s disappearance long-term,” Vargas Llosa said in a press conference.

Castro, an inspiration to revolutionaries around the world for decades, died on Friday night at age 90.

The Cuban leader was “the one who more or less kept the structure (of the country) immobilized and kept it from moving forward,” Vargas Llosa, who presented his latest novel, “Cinco esquinas,” at the book fair, said.

“There is no one who can replace Fidel as the myth, the legend or the eponymous hero that he became,” Vargas Llosa said, adding that Castro’s death was the reason that “the structures for domination and control will begin to crack little by little. And let’s hope that the process is fast and painless.”

The Cuban revolutionary was like “a hero out of an adventure novel” who was able to overthrow dictator Fulgencio Batista in 1959, Vargas Llosa, who was awarded the Nobel Prize in literature in 2010, said.

Castro, however, evolved from a man who promised a “deeply democratic” revolution to one who created a communist dictatorship, an act of “great opportunism” that allowed him to stay in power, the 80-year-old Vargas Llosa said.

 

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