|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Peru

Peruvian Rebel Leader Stonewalls Court about 1992 Attack

LIMA – The founder of Peru’s Shining Path rebel group, who is already serving a life sentence for terrorism, refused on Tuesday to answer questions from prosecutors about a deadly 1992 car bombing.

Abimael Guzman said he knew nothing about the July 16, 1992, blast on Lima’s Tarata St. that left 25 people dead.

“I don’t have anything to say because I have nothing to do with Tarata. When are you going to understand that?” he said.

“We are not paid adventurers, we are communist fighters,” Guzman said inside a special courtroom on Callao naval base near Lima, where he is imprisoned.

Prosecutors are seeking a second life sentence for Guzman, wife Elena Iparraguirre, and 11 other former Shining Path leaders as alleged co-conspirators in the Tarata attack.

One co-defendant likewise refused to answer questions about Tarata, while two others said they were prepared to cooperate.

At the end of the hearing, Guzman’s attorney, Alfredo Crespo, showed journalists a letter in which his client and several other co-defendants said that “as leaders, we have never ordered a specific action, so we could not have ordered the so-called Tarata action.”

“Moreover, as can be seen in documents, we are the ones who have criticized the regrettable action most harshly,” the missive said.

Guzman, 82, and his Shining Path colleagues also denied prosecutors’ claims that the Maoist-inspired guerrilla army allied itself with drug traffickers.

The Shining Path high command, including Guzman, were captured at a residence in Lima two months after the Tarata car bombing.

In a 2003 report, Peru’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission blamed Shining Path for the largest share of the 69,000 deaths during two decades of conflict between security forces and insurgents.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2015 © All rights reserved