|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Peru

Cacao Drives Coca Out of Remote Valley in Peru

TINGO MARIA, Peru – The organic cacao used to make the finest chocolate has banished drug trafficking from a lush valley in central Peru where cultivation of coca – the raw material of cocaine – was not so long ago the only viable occupation.

The unmistakable aroma of cacao now permeates the air in the Bolson Cuchara valley, located near the city of Tingo Maria in the Upper Huallaga region.

Once a bastion of drug traffickers, the Upper Huallaga saw the amount of land planted with coca decline from 17,500 hectares (43,200 acres) in 2009 to 1,099 hectares in 2015.

The dramatic change came with the arrival of the National Commission for Development and Life without Drugs (Devida), whose goal over the next four years is to reduce by half the 55,000 hectares of Peruvian land currently covered with coca through crop substitution focused on cacao, coffee, pineapple, and citrus.

“We’re not talking about just replacing coca, but about building roads, offering technical assistance and providing land titles to consolidate alternative, comprehensive, and sustainable development,” Devida chief Carmen Masias told EFE.

Despite the inauguration this week by Devida of five bridges in Bolson Cuchara, farmers headed to their fields must still make their way along winding trails through misty, densely wooded mountains in an area dominated for nearly three decades by Shining Path guerrillas.

“They are people who lived many years shackled to illegal activities by force, contending with Shining Path and the Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Movement, and drug trafficking,” Masias said. “There are in Peru 70,000 villages with fewer than 500 inhabitants, on steep terrain, and it requires creativity to reach all of them.”

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2015 © All rights reserved