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  HOME | Peru

Peru's Kuczynski Not Sure about Brazil-Peru Interoceanic Railroad

BEIJING - Peruvian President Pedro Pablo Kuczynski admitted in Beijing on Wednesday, the interoceanic railway project, proposed by China to connect Brazil's Atlantic coast with Peru's Pacific coast, might not be feasible owing to high costs and risk of low occupancy.

"It is an idea that was promoted last year to transport soybeans from Mato Grosso (in western Brazil) to China more quickly, but I have some questions regarding this train that I have expressed during this trip," the president said in an interview with EFE.

"The first is the cost, which is very high, and the second is if there is any return freight (from Peru to Brazil) because any transport system must have have both (delivery and return freights)," Kuczynski said.

"It (the project) will be reviewed and a decision will be made," added the president, who also raised other doubts over the project during his visit to China, including the height at which the railroad will be built and which will require the construction of numerous tunnels and push costs up further as well as the environmental implications since the railway line will pass through the Amazon forests.

These concerns have given rise to suggestions of an alternative route further south that would not pass through the Amazon and involve a third country, Bolivia.

 

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