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  HOME | Peru

Peru First Lady Denounces Court-Ordered Travel Ban

LIMA – A judge’s decision to ban her from traveling aboard for four months pending investigation for money laundering is an “absurdity,” Peruvian first lady Nadine Heredia said Friday.

On Thursday, Judge Richard Concepcion ruled that Heredia, brother Ilan Heredia, and the first lady’s friend Rocio Calderon must remain in Peru, check-in with police monthly, post bail of 50,000 soles (about $15,000) and remain at their current addresses for the next four months.

Heredia, wife of outgoing President Ollanta Humala and leader of the Peruvian Nationalist Party, criticized the judge for having simply adopted the language of the prosecution in his order.

“All of this is a concoction,” she told Canal N television of the charges that she accepted money from the government of late Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez and from private companies and used those funds to finance her husband’s 2006 and 2011 presidential campaigns.

The first lady denounced as “spurious” a letter ostensibly written by Chavez in 2006 with details about the alleged donation to Humala.

The letter includes phrases not typical of Chavez and the signature does not look genuine, Heredia said.

Prosecutors also accuse of Heredia of using family members to create companies that won government contractors.

After losing in 2006, Humala went on to triumph in the 2011 presidential contest.

 

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