|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Peru

Peru Government Extends Oil Pipeline Spill Emergency to 6 More Amazon Communities

LIMA – A state of emergency declared over a February oil pipeline spill has been extended to six additional Peruvian Amazon communities, the national government said in a decree published Friday in the official gazette.

The decree said the Feb. 3 North Peruvian Pipeline spill affected the Cashacaño stream, the Morona River and adjacent soil in the Morona district, located in the northern region of Loreto.

The spill damaged the local population’s health and adversely affected their livelihoods (fishing and agriculture), it added.

Around 743 people in the indigenous communities of Mayuriaga, Copacabana, Antena Cuatro, Santa Rosa del Marañon, San Francisco and Nuevo San Martin, all located in the Morona district, will be covered by the new 60-day emergency decree.

The national government intervened after a Civil Defense report, cited in the decree, found that the local and regional response was inadequate.

Earlier this week, the community of Mayuriaga signed an agreement with Petroperu, the state-owned company that operates the pipeline, and Civil Defense officials to improve their living conditions.

That accord was reached after protesters seized a helicopter and retained its crew as a protest measure aimed at pressuring the government to declare the community in a state of emergency.

Petroperu said the agreement calls for facilitating actions necessary to provide the community with electricity and telephone service, among other things.

The government’s initial decree covering the Morona district, issued on Feb. 28, declared a state of emergency affecting 16 other communities.

That came after the Feb. 3 North Peruvian Pipeline spill of an undetermined amount of crude contaminated different waterways, including the Mayuriaga and Morona rivers, and affected 2,500 people.

An earlier Jan. 25 spill of between 2,000 and 3,000 barrels of crude from that same pipeline left 100 people injured in Imaza – a district in the Amazonas region, which borders Loreto – and contaminated the Inayo and Chiriaco rivers, used for fishing by area communities.

Among the injured was a 12-year-old boy who participated in the clean-up effort and said Petroperu paid him two soles ($0.57) for each of bucket of oil he collected.

The Osinergmin energy and mining investment regulator, meanwhile, has fined the state-owned company 12.64 million soles (around $3.59 million) over the spill.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2015 © All rights reserved