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  HOME | Chile

Chile Inaugurates Japan-Style Pedestrian Crosswalks

SANTIAGO – The Santiago neighborhood of Las Condes introduced Monday a new type of crosswalk dubbed the “Tokyo Solution,” which allows pedestrians to cross streets obliquely, and which according to specialists will save them a lot of time.

The project, promoted by conservative Mayor Joaquin Lavin and located at the intersection of Rosario Norte and Cerro El Plomo Streets in the Chilean capital, is a pedestrian crossing that allows people to cross these streets diagonally, while all cars are kept at a standstill.

The idea was christened the “Tokyo Solution” for its similarity to the crosswalk in the Shibuya neighborhood of the Japanese capital, one of the busiest in the world.

The popular Japanese crosswalk is synchronized in such a way that vehicular traffic is stopped in all four directions, at which time pedestrians take to the crosswalk in the shape of a cross going in any direction, whether straight or diagonally.

Japan has close to 300 pedestrian crossings of this kind, which began as “scramble crossings” back in the 1940s in Kansas City and Vancouver, Canada.

In a statement to the daily Publimetro, Lavin said that this is the first time the Tokyo solution has been tried out in Chile.

“Only pedestrians can cross and to save them time they’re allowed to cross diagonally,” the mayor said, adding that if it proves to be a success at this intersection, it could well be repeated on other streets with massive traffic.

 

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