|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Chile

Meeting Fails between Chile’s Escondida Mining Company, Striking Workers

SANTIAGO – A meeting between striking miners’ leaders at the Escondida mining firm and company executives, convened to break the logjam in negotiations and end the work stoppage for higher salaries, resulted in “complete” failure on Monday.

Escondida union president Carlos Allendes told reporters that negotiations were “nowhere” after the meeting, adding that the mining firm operated by Australia’s BHP Billiton “is maintaining its intransigence.”

Some 2,500 miners are demanding pay hikes of 7 percent and a bonus of 25 million pesos (about $38,460) each, among other benefits.

The firm is offering a bonus of 8 million pesos, no pay raise and possible cutbacks in current benefits.

The critical points in the talks include the differing benefits for older and newer employees, adjustment of workdays and the reduction in bonuses that would impact salaries by up to 30 percent.

Escondida’s Corporate Affairs vice president, Patricio Vilaplana, said after the meeting that “as long as they’re continuing the blockades (of the mine’s entrance), the minimum legal conditions that would allow resumption of the dialogue with respect do not exist.”

BHP Billiton owns 57.5 percent of the La Escondida mine, among the minority shareholders of which are US Rio Tinto and Japan’s Jeco Corporation.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2015 © All rights reserved