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  HOME | Chile

Chile Vows to Protect Its Sovereignty on Border with Peru

SANTIAGO – The Chilean government stated on Thursday that it “will not be timid” in protecting its territorial sovereignty on the border with Peru.

“I want to assure the public, and those for whom it is most appropriate, that despite the fact that we’re simultaneously dealing with the Bolivian (territorial) demand, we will not be timid in protecting our territorial sovereignty on the border with Peru,” Foreign Minister Heraldo Muñoz told reporters.

His words came one day after Santiago sent two new diplomatic notes to Lima expressing its annoyance over the presence of Peruvian troops near the border and informing the neighboring country of the postponement of a top-level bilateral meeting that had been scheduled for Dec. 7.

Michelle Bachelet’s government has sent four diplomatic notes to Peru in recent days and has recalled its ambassador in Lima for consultations.

The recent creation of the La Yarada-Los Palos district, on the border, which was unanimously approved by the Peruvian Congress and which in the coming days must be implemented by Peruvian President Ollanta Humala, has caused unease among Chilean authorities.

Lima and Santiago disagree on the location of the border between their nations, with Chile saying that it is marked from a spot called Hito 1 while Peru claims that the border is located at Punto Concordia.

On that point, Peruvian Foreign Minister Ana Maria Sanchez on Wednesday said that the land and maritime borders with Chile are different because “they stem from different legal frameworks,” adding that “for Peru there is no unresolved issue” with its southern neighbor.

 

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