|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Argentina

Argentine Teachers on 48-Hour Strike at Start of School Year

BUENOS AIRES – Argentine teachers started a 48-hour strike to demand better pay and an increase in the public education budget just as the school year began, and called marches and acts of protest around the country.

Participation is “more than 85 percent, it’s a powerful strike,” Alejandro Demichelis, press secretary of the Education Workers Confederation (CTERA), the country’s largest teachers’ union, told EFE.

In a statement in front of Congress in Buenos Aires, from where hundreds of the protesters marched Monday morning to the Education Ministry, Demichelis complained that the Mauricio Macri administration “does not discuss, does not invest in education, undercuts the budget and has eliminated educational programs,” which means that teachers face “more adjustments all the time.”

“It’s a government absent from education, a government uninterested in public schools,” he said.

Besides the budget cutbacks, the teachers complain that last January the government eliminated national collective bargaining, the negotiation they had maintained with the Education Ministry to establish a minimum wage across the country. That amount is now adjusted by local governments according to their means.

A 20 percent increase above the existing minimum wage, the equivalent of 11,400 pesos ($553), has been established by unilateral decree.

On that basis, in the city of Buenos Aires the ruling party government proposed a raise of 12 percent, while Buenos Aires province put it at 15 percent, in line with the increases offered by different local governments run by a number of different parties around the country.

Secretary Vanesa Gagliardi of Ademys, the main educational union of Buenos Aires, denounced in a statement to EFE that teachers have lost 15 percent of their purchasing power between 2016-2017 and, according to their estimates, they’ll lose another 10 percent this year.

She told EFE that being paid a decent wage is very important because, in order be sure of “quality” in public education, teachers have to contribute a lot of work that goes unpaid, like preparing classes, correcting papers” and talking to students’ parents.

“When we speak of educational quality, it’s important to know that we teachers, in order to make it to the end of the month, have to work double or triple shifts,” Gagliardi said, before leaving to take part in another protest at one of the busiest intersections in Buenos Aires.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2018 © All rights reserved