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  HOME | Argentina

Argentina Marks 22nd Anniversary of Terror Attack

BUENOS AIRES – Argentine President Mauricio Macri, together with several members of the government and civil society, attended Monday in Buenos Aires the principal ceremony commemorating the attack on the headquarters of the AMIA Jewish community organization, a crime that has forever after gone unpunished.

Scores of people gathered at the scene of the attack to pay homage to the 85 victims who died in the violence.

Macri, accompanied by Cabinet chief Marcos Peña and other government ministers, placed a floral tribute there before remaining for the rest of the event.

A siren sounded at 9:53 a.m. to begin the commemoration ceremony, the time on a day like this in 1994 that a bomb exploded at the seat of the AMIA.

One by one, the victims were named.

The vice president of the AMIA, Ralph Thomas Saieg, demanded that concrete steps be taken to make progress in the investigation and asked the government to make it priority after 22 years of “dealing with the sad truth that not a single one of the killers has been caught.”

Many in the Argentine Jewish community believe the AMIA bombing was ordered by Iran and carried out by Tehran’s Hezbollah allies.

Both the Iranian government and the Lebanese militia group deny any involvement and the accusation relies heavily on information provided by the CIA and Israel’s Mossad spy agency.

Prosecutors have yet to secure a single conviction in the case.

In September 2004, 22 people accused in the bombing were acquitted after a process plagued with delays, irregularities and tales of witnesses being paid for their testimony.

The attack against the AMIA building was the second terrorist strike against Jewish targets in Argentina. In March 1992, a car bomb was detonated in front of the Israeli Embassy in Buenos Aires, killing 29 people and wounding more than 100 others.

 

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