|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Argentina

Relics Point to Possible Pre-Conquest Indigenous Settlement in Buenos Aires

BUENOS AIRES – The history of Argentina’s capital will need some revision if fragments of ceramic vessels, arrowheads and animal bones found by Argentine and Spanish archaeologists in southern Buenos Aires turn out to be as old as they seem.

“We found the remains of a village,” Daniel Schavelzon told EFE.

The Universidad de Buenos Aires archaeologist was part of a team that included experts from Spain’s Universidad del Pais Vasco.

He said the marks left by posts driven deep into the ground indicate the original inhabitants “were not nomads who came and went,” contrary to the accounts given in the chronicles of the first Spanish expeditions to reach the Buenos Aires region in the 16th century.

Decorative features on the ceramic pieces led the archaeologists to estimate that the settlement dates from the 12th century.

The absence of objects of European origin was the first clue that the settlement predated the Spanish conquest, Schavelzon said.

That realization also prompted a reorientation of the project, whose original aim was to find traces of the outpost Spaniard Pedro de Mendoza established in Buenos Aires in 1536.

“We never thought there were inhabitants before” the arrival of the Spanish, Schavelzon said.

The team has yet to determine whether the settlers were part of the Querandi, the name given by Ulrico Schmidl, a member of Mendoza’s expedition, to the people encountered on the southern shore of the River Plate.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2015 © All rights reserved