|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Argentina

Database Helps 1.5 Million Argentines Learn About Their Roots

BUENOS AIRES – More than 1.5 million people are using the digital database of the Latin American Migration Studies Center, or CEMLA, each year to search for information on the trans-Atlantic journeys of European migrants who arrived in Argentina in the 19th and 20th centuries, fleeing famine and war.

The center, founded by the Missionaries of St. Charles Borromeo, whose original mission was to assist Italian immigrants arriving in the country, has been gathering data for more than 30 years.

Among the database’s more than 7 million items, the most documented area is the great 1882-1960 migratory wave that brought millions of people escaping from hunger, war and political oppression to Argentina.

From Spain alone, “more than 1.5 million people” journeyed to what was then considered a land of opportunity, CEMLA president Irineu Zotti told EFE.

The center obtains data from handwritten records kept on ledgers by Argentina’s National Migration Administration and old magazines, research reports and newspapers, whose “excessive wear and tear from use” led the group to start an ambitious recovery project in 1992.

About 97 percent of the material has been digitized and there are more than 7 million indexed references accessible on one Web site, as well as a program specifically created by experts for this purpose, allowing users who contact CEMLA to find their roots.

In 2015, “about 1.6 million people visited the Web site with an average stay of seven minutes,” reviewing documents via the application, Zotti said.

As it works to digitize and index the remaining 3 percent of material, CEMLA is developing new apps that will allow easier classification of data, enabling cross references to locate specific information for research and a better understanding of history.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2015 © All rights reserved