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  HOME | Argentina

4,000 Remain in Shelters Due to Flooding in Argentina

BUENOS AIRES – Some 4,000 people are still evacuated from their homes in parts of the eastern Argentine provinces of Entre Rios and Santa Fe due to the overflowing of rivers during these past few weeks, authorities told EFE on Monday.

In Santa Fe, some 1,720 people are still living in temporary shelters, and the town hit hardest is the provincial capital, Santa Fe city, with almost 700 evacuees, regional government officials said.

River currents are now largely subsiding, which will gradually return Santa Fe province to normal.

In Entre Rios, a province devastated by floods over the Christmas season, 1,000 people remain evacuated in the town most affected, Concordia, where at one time some 10,000 people were displaced from their homes.

In Villa Paranacito, 800 families are still evacuated, the emergency management office told EFE.

Fortunately, in that area as well the normalization process is underway.

Floods in recent weeks have affected a wide area of South America’s Southern Cone, due to the cyclical climatic phenomenon known as El Niño, which struck with an intensity seldom seen since 1950.

 

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