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  HOME | Argentina

Argentina Repeats Falklands Claims on Anniversary of British Occupation

BUENOS AIRES – The Argentine government on Sunday reiterated, on the 183rd anniversary of the British occupation of the Falkland Islands, its claims to the South Atlantic archipelago, officials said.

“On Jan. 3, 1833, the (Falkland) Islands were occupied by British forces that dislodged the Argentine population and authorities legitimately established there, replacing them with subjects of the occupying power,” the Argentine Foreign Ministry said in a statement.

“The Argentine Republic immediately protested that act of illegitimate force that is still being maintained, without consenting to it at any time,” the sources said.

The government of Mauricio Macri emphasized that, since then, Argentina has expressed “the firm political will to exercise its ... sovereignty in the southern territories and maritime areas inherited from Spain.”

The government then reiterated its claims to the Falkland Islands (called the Malvinas by Argentina), the South Georgia Islands, the South Sandwich Islands and the maritime vicinity.

Argentina and the United Kingdom went to war over the islands in 1982, when Argentine troops invaded the archipelago.

Dying in the conflict, which ended with Argentina’s surrender, were 255 Britons, 3 islanders and 649 Argentines.

In March 2013, a plebiscite – not recognized by Buenos Aires – was held on the islands and the population overwhelmingly voted to remain linked to Britain.

After Macri took power on Dec. 10, the British government expressed its hope that the new government would not maintain the attitude of “harassment” it said former President Cristina Fernandez had displayed toward the islanders.

 

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