|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Argentina

Argentine Farm Associations Announce Strike

BUENOS AIRES – Three of the four major organizations representing Argentine farmers and ranchers began on Monday a five-day halt to sales of grain and livestock to protest the agricultural policies of President Cristina Fernandez.

The Confederacion Intercooperativa Agropecuaria, Confederaciones Rurales Argentinas and Sociedad Rural Argentina want an end to restrictions on grain exports and measures to counteract the erosion of profit margins in the sectors.

The Federacion Agraria Argentina has not endorsed the protest.

Organizers expect the strike to have no impact on the supply of food for Argentine consumers, Confederacion Intercooperativa Agropecuaria president Egidio Mailland told Radio America.

Unfavorable exchange rates and high inflation have made it impossible for Argentine growers and ranchers to cover their costs, Mailland said.

The strike “is not the best solution, and instead we need to keep talking,” Cabinet chief Anibal Fernandez (no relation to the president) said during his daily press conference.

He attributed the farmers’ difficulties to market conditions, notably “a phenomenal slump in prices,” and said that while “there are those who seek public policies of a different color, the conditions do not exist to implement them.”

President Fernandez has been at odds with the most powerful elements in the agriculture sector since taking office nearly eight years ago.

In 2008, Argentina – one of the world’s top grain exporters – lost millions of dollars to commercial strikes and other disruptive protests.

That conflict began when the Fernandez administration imposed a calibrated tax on soy exports, seeking to capture some of the immense windfall garnered by Argentine agribusiness during years of a booming international market.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2015 © All rights reserved