|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Mexico

Mexico Agrees to Host 3rd-Country Nationals Seeking US Asylum

MEXICO CITY – The Mexican government agreed on Thursday to provide temporary sanctuary for nationals from third countries while they await adjudication of their applications for asylum in the United States.

President Donald Trump’s administration has been pressing Mexico to accept the return of undocumented Central American migrants who entered the US from Mexican territory.

Within minutes of Thursday’s announcement, the legal adviser to the Mexican Foreign Relations Secretariat, Alejandro Alday, said that Washington’s decision to require the asylum seekers to submit their applications from outside the country was based on US legislation and national sovereignty.

Mexico, as a function of its “sovereignty and independence” and in accord with domestic law and international commitments, will “receive some of those non-Mexican migrants” in the interest of ensuring respect for their human rights, Alday said.

“This (US) unilateral measure puts (the migrants) in an enormously volatile situation,” he said.

Once in Mexico, migrants will be able to apply for work permits, Alday said.

Mariana Zaragoza, coordinator of the Migration Affairs program at Mexico City’s Universidad Iberoamericana, said that it was a mistake for Mexico to accede to Washington’s wishes in this matter.

Pointing to the large number of Central American migrants already suffering in precarious conditions in the border city of Tijuana while pursuing asylum in the US, she described the situation as “a time-bomb.”

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2020 © All rights reserved