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  HOME | Mexico

Mexicans Protest against NAFTA Talks, Say It Hurts Their Country

MEXICO CITY – Thousands of members of social and trade unions protested on Wednesday in Mexico City against the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), claiming the pact marginalizes local farmers and hurts the country.

A few hours after Mexico, the United States and Canada began the first round of renegotiation of the treaty in Washington DC, protesters gathered around the Angel of Independence Monument in central Mexico City and marched nearly three kilometers towards the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

During the march, the unions, which joined together under the slogan “Mexico Better Without NAFTA,” held posters saying “The NAFTA Hurts You.”

Several trade union leaders took the occasion to criticize issues concerning the treaty, which was meant to be signed for the benefit of Mexicans, such as the loss of purchasing power of local workers, the import of food products and seeds from the US and the loss of Mexican sovereignty.

As the march concluded, the protesters read a manifesto, which was later delivered to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, stating that the government did not have enough social support to renegotiate the NAFTA.

 

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