|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Mexico

More Oncologists, Raising Public Awareness Are Key in Mexico’s Cancer Fight

MEXICO CITY – The plan for attacking cancer in Mexico must include turning out more oncologists from medical schools, better cooperation among institutions and raising public awareness about the need for regular checkups, experts agreed on Monday.

“Without a doubt, the ability of any national health care system depends on the production of human resources,’ said Dr. German Enrique Fajardo at the forum entitled “Cancer: Challenges in Mexico and Latin America” organized by Agencia EFE, Spain’s international news agency, and the daily El Universal.

“We have a very small production of medical experts in oncology,” said Fajardo, adding that there are 1,700 oncologists in Mexico with 44 new cancer surgeons graduating each year.

In addition, just 10 percent of the country’s 160 medical schools “have oncology as a subject in their training (program),” he added.

The problem, moreover, lies not only in the number of available oncologists but also in their distribution.

The solution is to gradually distribute qualified personnel around the country, something that – Fajardo said – is not easy.

Another of the speakers, Roman Rosales, said that members of the public must also “go to the doctor in a timely way.”

Dr. Pedro Mario Escudero agreed that “preventive medicine” is vital for dealing with cancer, which each year takes 80,000 lives in Mexico, along with educating the public on health matters.

Escudero said that policies must focus on the “most frequent” tumors, and “we must ask ourselves what we have to do ... to get better results.”

The experts also called for ameliorating – via better cooperation among institutions – the negative effects of a fragmented health care system.

“The interchange of ... planned services can help resolve a large number of problems,” Fajardo said.

Dr. Abelardo Meneses said that after the implementation of the national cancer registry, the next step will be to implement “the comprehensive program for prevention and control of cancer, which is necessary (in Mexico) to reduce the weight and burden of the disease.”

There is still a “very important gap between (current action) and what remains to be done,” given that a 66 percent increase in cancer cases is expected by 2030, Escudero said.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2015 © All rights reserved