|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Mexico

Authorities from Spain and Mexico Work to Solve Spanish Woman’s Disappearance

VALENCIA, Spain – Juan Carlos Moragues, the central government’s representative to the Valencia regional government, said on Tuesday that Spanish authorities were working with Mexican investigators to find Pilar Garrigues, who disappeared in Mexico.

Moragues told reporters that he spoke with Raquel, the missing woman’s sister, and that the family was “in permanent contact” with the Spanish Foreign Ministry and the Mexican Federal Police.

The 34-year-old woman, who has lived in Mexico for about three years, disappeared on July 2 after spending a day at the beach with her husband and 1-year-old son in Tamaulipas, a northeastern state on the border with the US.

“They stopped her and abducted her, and we’re investigating together with the Mexican Federal Police,” Moragues said.

Tamaulipas security spokesman Luis Alberto Rodriguez, for his part, said the victim’s husband filed a missing persons report hours after she was kidnapped near the city of Soto La Marina.

Rodriguez said investigators had listed Pilar Garrigues as a “person who has not been located” and not as a kidnapping victim because no ransom demand has been made.

The Tamaulipas Attorney General’s Office said in a statement sent to EFE that there were no “indications that she may have been deprived of her freedom.”

Garrigues and her family were returning to their home in Ciudad Victoria, the capital of Tamaulipas, after spending several days at the beach.

Tamaulipas, which is on the border with Texas, has been plagued by drug-related violence for years.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2015 © All rights reserved