|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Mexico

Mexicans Take Up Arms against Organized Crime

CHILPANCINGO, Mexico – Hundreds of residents of a mining region in southern Mexico have taken up arms to confront the criminal outfits terrorizing the area, the vigilantes told EFE on Monday.

The self-defense group comprises people from at least 10 communities in the Mezcala mining district, roughly 30 kilometers (19 miles) from Chilpancingo, capital of Guerrero state.

“So much kidnapping, so much extortion. We are tired of it. We ask for help from the government. They don’t hear us,” one of the vigilantes said.

“What we want is peace and so we are taking up arms today to defend our families,” he said.

The new militia plans to patrol the sector of the Los Filos, Bermejal, El Guaje, and Limon gold mines.

The vigilantes were joined Sunday by other residents of Mezcala in blocking the main highway from Mexico City to the Guerrero coastal resort city of Acapulco to dramatize their demand for improved public safety.

Gangs are using intimidation to force residents to hand over a portion of the rent inhabitants receive from the mine operators.

“In Carrizalillo, they take 10 percent of the annual rent that the miner pays us, and if we don’t give it to them, they kill us,” an area farmer told EFE.

The farmer belongs to a rural cooperative – known as an ejido – that gets $54,000 a year from Canadian-owned miner Gold Corp.

Two criminal organizations, Guerreros Unidos and Los Rojos, are engaged in a bloody struggle for control of Mezcala, which commands access to the mountains where most of Guerrero’s marijuana and opium poppies are grown.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2015 © All rights reserved