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  HOME | Mexico

Mexico Writer Who Reported Femicides in Juarez Dies

MEXICO CITY – The writer and essayist known for his work of reporting the incidence of female homicides, or femicides, in Ciudad Juarez, died Monday in Mexico City, the Culture Secretariat announced. He was 67.

In a statement, the National Fine Arts Institute (INBA), said that writer Sergio Gonzalez Rodriguez had died of a heart attack.

The writer was known for his research into the violence targeting women in the border town of Ciudad Juarez, which he analyzed in articles for the daily Reforma and in the book “Huesos en el Desierto” (Bones in the Desert).

In that book, published in 2002, he revealed the vast wave of femicides in that northern Mexican city, as well as the countless cases of rape and torture there victimizing women and little girls.

A frequent pattern of these crimes is a complicity among the killers, local authorities and security forces protected by the impunity that reigns in the country.

In his 2009 work “El Hombre sin Cabeza,” Gonzalez Rodriguez speaks of the rituals of violence enacted by criminal gangs and in “Campo de Guerra,” which won the Anagrama Essay Prize in 2014, he shows how military surveillance can be imposed under the pretext of fighting terrorism.

The writer worked in research on the Board of Historical Studies at the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH), as a scriptwriter for the television series “Mexico, 20th Century,” and as director of the publication El Nacional Dominical.

Culture Secretary Maria Cristina Garcia Cepeda said she deeply regrets the death of the writer, and in a message posted on Twitter expressed her condolences “to his relatives and to the daily Reforma,” where he worked as a columnist.

 

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