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  HOME | Brazil (Click here for more)

Brazil Auto Production Falls 15.3% amid Truckers Strike

SAO PAULO – Brazil’s vehicle production fell 15.3 percent last month, a drop that the ANFAVEA automakers association attributed in part to the truckers’ strike that nearly paralyzed Brazil for 11 days.

ANFAVEA president Antonio Megale told reporters at a press conference that the truckers’ strike – the main demand of which was for a reduction in fuel prices – cost Brazil the production of between 70,000 and 80,000 vehicles.

“We unfortunately interrupted a sequence of growth,” he said.

Despite last month’s plunge in production, as many as 1.17 million cars, trucks and buses were manufactured over the first five months of this year, or a 12.1 percent increase when compared to the same period in 2017.

In May, however, the South American country manufactured 212,294 vehicles, compared to the 266,140 produced in April.

Automobile exports were also significantly affected by the logistical problems caused by the strike, which disrupted port activity throughout the country, especially at Santos, Latin America’s largest maritime terminal.

Vehicle exports, which had helped boost the industry’s recovery over the past few months, plunged 17.3 percent in May compared with the same month in 2017.

Despite the economic loss stemming from the strike, Megale said that the sector has recovered “swiftly.”

 

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