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  HOME | Brazil (Click here for more)

Brazil’s New Federal Police Director Promises to Fight Corruption

BRASILIA – Commissioner Fernando Segovia assumed his new position on Monday as director general of Brazil’s Federal Police with a speech saying that his priority will be to fight corruption and support operations like the dismantling of the gigantic network that made off with billions in Petrobras funds.

At the ceremony presided over this Monday by Brazilian President Michel Temer, Segovia became head of the Brazilian organization that has most distinguished itself in the war on corruption, and said there could be no doubt he would continue that work.

His words came in response to claims that he was named commander of the Federal Police thanks to his connections with leaders of the Brazilian Democratic Movement Party (PMDB), the party headed by Temer and lately one of the political organizations most smeared with corruption scandals.

“We will combat corruption tirelessly in Brazil, and that will remain the priority on the Federal Police agenda,” Segovia said at the ceremony where he replaced former Commissioner Leandro Daiello, who commanded the force for six years until his recent resignation for personal reasons.

“On that basis we will continue special operations like Lava Jato and all the others underway, plus investigations for Supreme Federal Court trials (the only court that can try politicians with privileged status accused of corruption),” Segovia said.

Lava Jato, launched more than three years ago, is the largest operation for fighting corruption in the history of Brazil and has sent to prison dozens of big business owners and executives, politicians and public servants accused of diverting funds from the state-run oil company Petrobras, the largest business in the country.

 

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