|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Brazil (Click here for more)

Amnesty International Defending Rights at Risk in Brazil

BRASILIA – Amnesty International launched on Monday a campaign to defend Brazilians’ rights it feels could be “suppressed” by 138 projects that are currently being debated in Parliament.

“They are bills representing a sharp reversal of the rights Brazilians have,” the executive director of AI in Brazil, Jurema Werneck, said at an event held in front of the legislature in Brasilia.

Among several examples, the activist cited a bill intended to make regulations governing citizens’ access to “personal defense” weapons more flexible, a measure being pushed by some of the parties in the coalition backing President Michel Temer.

“Almost 60,000 people are murdered each year in Brazil,” said Werneck, basing her comment on government statistics, adding that the public “expects a responsible Congress that establishes laws that control even more the ownership and use of firearms, and not (laws) that free things up.”

According to Werneck, the 138 bills that have been identified as a “potential risk to the rights” of Brazilians deal with issues of public security, repression of protests, sexuality and the creation of new indigenous territories, among others.

Participating in the event headed by Werneck before Congress were a number of AI activists, who wore masks representing influential politicians who are supporting those bills and held signs on which could be read “Don’t blow our rights.”

The aim of the human rights defense organization is to begin a signature collection campaign with an eye toward presenting the document to Congress to demand that bills considered to be “harmful to rights” be shelved.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2015 © All rights reserved