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  HOME | Brazil (Click here for more)

Temer Appoints Brazil’s Next Attorney General amid Corruption Allegations

BRASILIA – Brazilian President Michel Temer appointed Raquel Dodge on Wednesday as successor to current Attorney General Rodrigo Janot, who accused the president earlier this week of committing passive corruption, officials said.

Dodge is set to replace Janot when his term in office ends in September.

According to a statement on Wednesday by spokesperson for the Brazilian government Alexandre Parola, Dodge is the first woman to be appointed as prosecutor general.

Dodge, who currently serves as assistant prosecutor general and oversees criminal cases under the Superior Court of Justice, has shown a moderate stance towards the allegations made by Janot.

Dodge’s appointment will need to go through a debate in the Senate, where Temer currently holds the majority. If approved, she will serve as prosecutor general for the next two years, starting from September.

The announcement was made amid a political crisis in Brazil, which has shaken the government of Temer.

The president has been accused by prosecutors of committing passive corruption, based on the testimony of several executives from meat packing company JBS.

The accusations came as part of an extensive open investigation into the head of state regarding possible crimes of passive corruption, obstruction of justice and illicit association, although the prosecution has not yet accused the president of the last two.

Suspicions about the Brazilian president are based on the testimonies of several JBS directors, who have accused Temer of receiving bribes since 2010, and an explosive audio recording in which the president listened in silence and even reportedly consented to committing the alleged crimes.

 

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