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  HOME | Brazil (Click here for more)

Brazilian Protests against Corruption Have Low Turnout

RIO DE JANEIRO – The demonstrations against corruption called on Sunday by movements that last year mobilized millions of Brazilians against now-deposed President Dilma Rousseff obtained turnout much below organizers’ expectations.

Although some of the protests were scheduled for Sunday afternoon, those that had been scheduled for the morning transpired without incident but attracted relatively few people and were concluded in much less time than originally anticipated.

The protests with the highest participation, according to police, were those in Rio de Janeiro, where some 600 people turned out on the oceanside boulevard bordering Copacabana Beach, and the one in Brasilia, which attracted about 500 people to the plaza in front of Congress.

Demonstrations with at least 400 people were held in other cities, including Belo Horizonte, Juiz de Fora, Belen and Salvador.

The protests were staged against growing corruption in Brazil in at least 20 larger cities, but some of the marches in 127 municipalities in 25 of the country’s 27 states attracted no more than 20 people.

Most of the protesters wore green and yellow clothing, the colors of Brazil’s flag, and many carried signs supporting the investigation of the huge bribery scandal involving state-run oil company Petrobras that has tainted more than 100 politicians including six government ministers.

Some of the protesters called for the return of the military to govern Brazil, others for the suspension of the law limiting the carrying of weapons and some focused on criticizing the retirement reform being pushed by the government.

Only a few protesters, however, called for the resignation of President Michel Temer, who last August replaced Rousseff but has also been tainted by accusations of corruption.

 

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