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  HOME | Brazil (Click here for more)

Brazilian Fractures Pelvis after Breaking into Rome’s Iconic Colosseum

ROME – A dauntless Brazilian tourist fractured his pelvis after breaking into Rome’s famed Colosseum at night, police told EFE on Monday.

The young man had climbed one of the entry gates with a friend in an attempt to visit the usually tourist-packed site up close.

The duo then unwittingly fell from a four-meter (13-feet) height, with one suffering light bruising and the unluckier of the two fracturing his pelvis.

The relatively-unscathed partner in crime quickly called emergency services, who were baffled by the irregular presence of the two Brazilian sightseers at Rome’s quintessential monument.

The man with the broken hip was rushed to San Giovanni Addolorata hospital, where he is expected to stay over the next few weeks.

The stunt had an unpleasant ending for the pair – who have remained unnamed but are reported to be of 31 and 33 years of age – as police immediately charged both with criminal trespass.

The landmark formally known as the Flavian Amphitheater began its construction under the emperor Vespasian in 72 AD and was completed eight years later during the rule of his son and heir, Titus.

Capable of seating between 50,000 and 80,000 spectators, the Colosseum is considered by experts to be the largest amphitheater ever built.

The venue hosted a variety of shows, such as gladiator fights, animal hunts and gory executions by wild beasts, as well as “naumachiae” (simulated sea battles).

It is currently Rome’s most popular tourist attraction, with the iconic silhouette of the partially-ruined structure indelibly linked to the Italian capital’s image.

 

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