|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Ecuador (Click here for more)

Correa Praises Pope and Boosts His Own Climate Change Project

ROME – Ecuadorean President Rafael Correa has praised the mediating role played by Pope Francis, and after participating as the only head of state in an environmental forum sponsored by the United Nations and the Vatican, promoted his own policies to fight climate change.

After his second private hearing with the Pope, Correa told Efe and Vatican Radio that the “moral authority of the Pope, his leadership, is immense” when he mediates in international conflicts.

“I think that there may be a lot of space for such mediations,” he said.

“In particular, what he achieved between Cuba and the United States, that is historic,” acknowledged Correa.

“In any case, my immense gratitude to the Holy Father for this opportunity to meet again,” Correa continued.

“We talked about the workshop on climate change, the new encyclical and his next visit to Ecuador,” Correa said in an interview after meeting the Pope.

Correa emphasized the need to “produce more with less energy, with the minimum of resources” after participating in an international forum at the Vatican called “Protect the earth, dignify humanity”.

In his speech at the forum, Correa argued that most environmental damage, caused by rich countries, should raise the possibility of developing countries being compensated, to better ensure the planet’s conservation.

Correa used his country’s request for compensation from the international community to preserve the oil beneath the Yasuni National Park in the Ecuadorean Amazon, to illustrate his position on climate change.

The leader said that although the project is yet to receive widespread backing, the arguments in favour are impeccable as “it is about environmental justice.”

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2015 © All rights reserved